Produced from 1907 to 1933 the Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle’s name originates from its original designer Augustus Saint-Gaudens. President Theodore Roosevelt commissioned the new coin to pay homage to the birthplace of Democracy: Greece.

 

The front side features an image of Lady Liberty holding a torch in one hand, signifying lighting the path towards the future. Her other hand is holding olive branches symbolically representing peace. On the back side is the image of the majestic flying eagle.

 

This coin is a very limited production coin, with many variations. There are “High Relief” variations which only 11,250 were minted and then changed due to banking compatibility concerns.

 

There are also a “no motto” and “motto” variations of the Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle coins. President Roosevelt did not want the words “In God we Trust” to be added onto the coin for various reasons. Due to an uproar from Congress they were subsequently added. Thus are also two versions of this “flat relief” coin.

 

Each has its own rarity and uniqueness, but because only so few were minted overall, the value can appreciate much faster than just gold bullion during a precious metals run.

Pre 1933 $20 Saint-Gauden

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